Tuesday, November 19, 2002

my computer is unusually slow today...
On Voting

I had a conversation recently with a friend about voting. He asked me if I had, and I replied that I had not. He asked me why. I said that voting in an election is useless. He then was offended, explaining that it is not only a right but a duty to participate in democracy.

To which I replied: Of course, if it was a democracy. In a democracy there is debate, a weighing of the issues, a healthy dialogue between participants which hopefully leads to an informed decision.

However, what we have now is an auction. The votes go to the highest bidder.

The three percent (I am being generous) of the population that actually keeps on top of the issues by reading the newspaper and watch specific debates over year-long periods are simply being overwhelmed by the great mass of last-minute decisioners who respond solely to advertizing on television.

The people who are promoting TV ads (the main parties and their supporters) are essentially buying the general public's vote by making a tasty commercial product.

If this is not a corruption of the democratic process, I don't know what is.

The reason why it works is because people vote like sheep, based on the running candidate's skin color, religion, or the resonance of his or her last name.

If people should stop voting in elections in which they do not know any issues, the commercials would be useless, and the money needed for the commercials would be better spent elsewhere, or would not need to be raised, in shich case the elected officials who are supposed to WORK for us would spend less time at fundraisers and ra-ra rallies and actually spend time doing what we hired them to do.

Effectively, if no one votes except those who know the issue inside and out, politicians would have to appeal to those people, which means that they would have to argue their candidacy on the merit of their performance rather than on their fundraising capabilities.

The other, real, way to vote is to specifically not buy products from companies who give money to political parties.

People vote, companies don't. The reason why companies don't vote is because they are not people. People only should vote. Allowing companies to essentially buy votes with money is effectively allowing the company to vote.
As long as companies are voting that way, via political contributions, we don't have a working democracy.
Companies only worry about the bottom line. They are not interested in anything else. If the bottom line gets hurt because they contribute financially to political parties, then they will stop. And if their political contribution (vote-buying via political ads) are not effective to their bottom line, they will stop contributing.
On Voting

I had a conversation recently with a friend about voting. He asked me if I had, and I replied that I had not. He asked me why. I said that voting in an election is useless. He then was offended, explaining that it is not only a right but a duty to participate in democracy.

To which I replied: Of course, if it was a democracy. In a democracy there is debate, a weighing of the issues, a healthy dialogue between participants which hopefully leads to an informed decision.

However, what we have now is an auction. The votes go to the highest bidder.

The three percent (I am being generous) of the population that actually keeps on top of the issues by reading the newspaper and watch specific debates over year-long periods are simply being overwhelmed by the great mass of last-minute decisioners who respond solely to advertizing on television.

The people who are promoting TV ads (the main parties and their supporters) are essentially buying the general public's vote by making a tasty commercial product.

If this is not a corruption of the democratic process, I don't know what is.

The reason why it works is because people vote like sheep, based on the running candidate's skin color, religion, or the resonance of his or her last name.

If people should stop voting in elections in which they do not know any issues, the commercials would be useless, and the money needed for the commercials would be better spent elsewhere, or would not need to be raised, in shich case the elected officials who are supposed to WORK for us would spend less time at fundraisers and ra-ra rallies and actually spend time doing what we hired them to do.

Effectively, if no one votes except those who know the issue inside and out, politicians would have to appeal to those people, which means that they would have to argue their candidacy on the merit of their performance rather than on their fundraising capabilities.

The other, real, way to vote is to specifically not buy products from companies who give money to political parties.

People vote, companies don't. The reason why companies don't vote is because they are not people. People only should vote. Allowing companies to essentially buy votes with money is effectively allowing the company to vote.
As long as companies are voting that way, via political contributions, we don't have a working democracy.
Companies only worry about the bottom line. They are not interested in anything else. If the bottom line gets hurt because they contribute financially to political parties, then they will stop. And if their political contribution (vote-buying via political ads) are not effective to their bottom line, they will stop contributing.

Tuesday, October 22, 2002

Therapy went well, kindof. Anyway.

Had a virtual headbutting with Winer on the xml-rpc yahoo group. Eh.

Friday, October 18, 2002

So we're going to the therapist again tonight. We'll see how that works out.
what now?
One more time with the templates
ahh, I feel better...
Arrgghhh.

I hate all blogging tools.

I'm gonna roll my own, and it's going to be bithcing, and it's going to be fucking free, and will work off any computer, and... Dang... It will be open source but not free. You people force (FORCE) me to write my own because you can't frigging write decent software.

Maybe that's what's wrong in the software industry: No good software at no good prices.

I want stuff that installs nicely (and uninstalls nicely) with just ONE word/click. And that I don't have to fuck with for the rest of my life.

I want the thing to work right the first time. I expect it out of my car, I expecti out of my software. Volkswagen can devliver, why can't the software industry. Isn't it multi-billion dollar rich?
Well, now my whole css is completely screwed.

Blogger: Do us all a favor. Rewrite your code... ;)
Fucked up again. I hate blogger again. they have a bug.
OK. the site is performing as required. I like blogger again.
now to see if the a # works.
Now Blogger is stripping my div tags. Ack!
Testin again the CSS
You might have noticed, I'm playing with css again... I am incorrigible.
The FTP problems were with our firewall. Anyway. The xml-rpc traffic is still going through, imagine that.

Thursday, October 17, 2002

ftp problems with the site.

Wednesday, October 16, 2002

Dan Shafer asks about a payment model for blogs. I replied in the comments.

Tuesday, October 15, 2002

So today I am very tired. I went to the computer place until late last night after Yumi was in a bad mood, and I was tired and just wanted to sleep. So instead I stayed up 6 more hours. I fight sleep deprivation constantly and I am very irritable and unproductive when I haven't had enough sleep.

Maybe I should move out....
So of course I am in the middle of writing a slashdot reply and I think to myself: "Heck, this is perfect for my blog." But then by the time I get over to blogger, log in and all that I have already forgotten what rant I was going to spew...

Wednesday, September 25, 2002

So I hear about Blogs and such on IRights and I hear them talking about pingback...

Now, I ask myself... Why would I want to be notified when someone links to my entry? It would feed my vanity, or course... But as far as being worthwhile? I don't know. I think email works better for that kind of communication. Also, I think the google method I outlined on Aug 12 is better for that. If you want to see who links to you, you can, but you won't be attacked by it.

Thursday, September 12, 2002

This article in the Los Angeles Times: Crashing the blog party. Quite a good read.
I originally posted this on [/.]

Who said anything about "buying" CDs or DVDs? The hardware required will be this: CPU+Motherboard+HD. Everything else will be wireless in the home/office/neighborhood with self-healing and self configuring wireless network and "bridging" from wireless area to wireless area provided by fiber. The systems will have enough HD space (THANK YOU MAXTOR!!!) to store/cache all content out there simultaneously, without requiring centralized systems.

The systems will also run linux/java/python systems, will communicate through encrypted and user-managed protocols (like it was in the elder days) and the systems will just work 24/7. Take a look at the networking principles behind gaming (counterstrike etc) and hardcore porn to find fully decentralized (nothing to take down that can't be brought back up) and anonymous.

Your average consumer will be able to buy a $200 box with wireless, HD, AMD/transmeta, wireless (all protocols) etc, plug it in, and use the remote in the HDTV and voice activation to do all their stuff (movie, music, chatting online) (On an aside, how long until HDTVs come with built in cameras and microphones?) --If not the HDTV then your Playstation 2007.

See the internet from 1996 to 2002? 6 years. from 2002 to 2008? 6 years. Wireless everywhere. enterprise-grade servers as small as VCRs with terabytes of storage, IPv6, and giga-ethernet.
Want a movie? Pick up the remote, click the first three letters of the name, and press play. Free of charge. You know why? Because that movie will exist as nondescript 1meg chunks all over the network, and be fully downloaded to your own HD by the time the SurroundSound logo is displayed.

==

This was the optimistic view-- Now for the MS version.

==

Now you see what they want DRM for. MS wants to charge you for viewing that flick, and Hollyweird is (good boy, good boy; sit, Ubu, sit) fetching the legislators to make it happen.

Microsoft sees computer hardware like cars. In the beginning of the auto industries, there were thousands of automakers in the US. Now there are only three, and only two are not owned by a foreign corp, but are in bed hummering them [yeah, pun]. Same for airlines. 1950, a bunch. Now: Boeing, Airbus.

You see, they are using legislation to raise the "cost of entry" in the computer industry. They are finishing it in software, they are doing it in hardware. They (Microsoft) want to OWN all hardware manufaturers, keiretsu style (look it up, it's fascinating), worldwide, and thus be able to provide it "at reasonable cost" and with "adequate safeguards" to insure public safety and compliance with existing laws.

The beauty of this little scenario is that it's a true and tried method. Many industries have consolidated until there were only one or two top players. As long as industry centralization is not seen as a bother to the economy, governments turn a blind eye. I'll give you another example: Look at keyboards. It used to be that there were many companies making keyboards. It's a commodity now. It's almost free. People don't think about them. There's no talk about "opening the door" to competition in the keyboard market.
How about cell phones? Ericsson is tanking. Now all phones essentially do the same thing. They all have the same features. The base models are all "given" to you when you sign up for service. There's no talk about reviving competition in the cell-phone business. Now, they are basically all made in half a dozen factories in southern China, Taiwan, and Malaysia.

Likewise computers will be cheap, disposable items, and they will be all made the same, and sold below cost (like game consoles), and Microsoft will make its money from collecting the fee for "displaying" your "hollywood-provided" content (so that you, the consumer, may enjoy the oustanding performance as the Director intended).

Then the cost-of-entry or cost-of-staying in this business will be too great for competitors (who will fold^H^H^H^Hdiversify) and MS will essentially have aquired and entire industry without raising antitrust concerns.

===
now some ranting
===

I say fooey on all that. If AMD wants to play that game then they're going to lose market share, not gain any. The only people who don't care about DMR in their machines are already conditioned to buy Intel.

On the other hand, if they play their cards right, then they can ride the wave of the future and say buhbye to WinTel.

Remember. Geeks vote, and geeks end up making more money than non-geeks. Geeks are in fact the prime demographic for AMD. The only reason this hasn't been advertised is that geeks respond adversely to advertising. Without geeks, AMD would have tanked a long time ago. They'd better get their priorities straight. For AMD, it's not about meeting the street numbers for next quarter, it's about having a quarter after that.

Tuesday, August 27, 2002

Tara Grubb on the Middle East and other rantings.
According to her, "The Middle East is gangrenous--an eating sore. Cut the limb before it gets to the heart. It's come close enough."
Aha! Cut it off, she says: What does that mean, exactly, cutting off a region of the world with 120+millions of people?

Do we ban all of them from coming to the US? Do we stop exporting to that region? Do we stop importing from that region? Do we try to convince our allies to stop importing and exporting to that region?

Or do we really cut them off? Like burn them off in a nuclear fire?

I mean, if it's a gangrenous sore, then, we've got to go out there and wipe them out, wipe it clean, right?

Well, I for one, don't think so. The Middle East is a beautiful place that got a bad rap over the years. When a child is misbehaving, you don't cut them off. You help them heal, you shelter them, encourage them, teach them.

And you never ever treat them like a disease.

Friday, August 23, 2002

9/11 media coverage, 'nuff said.
I have slowly but surely stopped reading the news. It was so fucking depressing, and absolutely content-less.

I wonder. If I wrote summaries, summaries from news articles in newspapers from around the world, I wonder if they would be more interesting? Novella style, you know. What if people could read a 70 pages summary of a particular situation, would that be better?
So I went to the cyber café last night (again) (and to the great chagrin of my wife) and played flight simulator 2002. I flew from some no-name runway in laos, across vietnam, and did a pretty good landing approach on a chinese airport. I crashed 40 feet to the right of the runway. (dang) And then only because there were some fierce cross-winds.
Also, I probably would have landed the thing no problem had I had a joystick. You know how hard it is to land a twin prop on "hard" setting on a windy day with the numerical keypad?

Anyway, It was fun. I would go pick up a good joystick (with rudder and throttle) but my wife would go nuts (according to her, I am NEVER to return to that Hall of Doom).

Ahh, the joys of marriage.

Wednesday, August 21, 2002

I was asking myself what I should write when I didn't have anything earth-shattering to say. I came up with something: Nothing. I feel the whole blog thing is like kids in the playground screaming "Me ME MEEE!!!" to get the ball.
Yet, parts of it are interesting, because some of those kids (allegorically speaking) become world class soccer player and defeat France in the first round at the World Cup.
It's like that in software too, I think. People who scream and kick the most may look silly to outsiders, and to a lot of insiders seem obnoxious, but they are the ones who would someday topple the reigning champions.

Did you know Linus played Doom while developing Linux?

What good mom and pop is now complaining about their kids playing video games and such? They should be very aware that they need to be careful not to stifle innovation by promoting some 19th century ideals about the world. There is nothing more frustrating to me that seeing a bright kid be bridled by clueless parents. So what if a 14 year old girl is reading Anaïs Nin? Maybe she'll read Ayn Rand next, and be the this century's greatest thinker by the time she's 41. Are you out of your mind to tell her she has to read "Teen"?

Monday, August 12, 2002

there was a stupid post here.
One for Dave. How about putting a little item for each permalink on a blog entry that goes and gets the links that point there via google's link: feature?
About the blog architecture, I like that potential detractors are not automatically given a forum to air their rants. The slashdot format is one thing, blogs are another.
Found this from dave at Ozzie's on blog architecture.

Friday, August 02, 2002

There was a post here but I took it out. Sowwy.
I have to admit, letting mercenaries and such hunt saddam down for a cool billion does not seem like a bad idea. See The Free-Enterprise Solution

Tuesday, July 30, 2002

Robots in Combat, courtesy of Yahoo!. I was thinking, this is not such a bad idea. Maybe MTV's RobotWars was good for something after all.
All files under pipeline completed. Need to check the ones in itlanet. Need to check if the ffiec lookup is being performed correctly. Maybe rename the itlanet folder to see what else breaks.
Was on /. and saw that my karma was excellent. Of course, that does not help me to select a matching tie...
All mdb files within pipeline/itlanet/ relinked properly.
savings.mdb relinked
converted savings.mdb from 97 to 2000
Mailer machine back up. Was still linking to novell server.
Audit DB relinked
audit2000 database relinked
Pool Assumptions database relinked.
LSBO database relinked
Changed the template to Chroma.
Changed the template (again)
fixed amx.mdb database linking

The Riaa


Maybe they need to realise that people will buy records from companied that are NOT members of the RIAA, such as JetsetRecords. Eh!
finished relinking audit database
Went on an editing rampage on wikipedia. See 395.
Lunch was good... Silly blog so far huh?
Yumi just called. She's bringing me lunch :)
refreshed links in amd.mdb
refreshed linked tables for idsrpt.mdb
So I got blogger to start working again...
I am looking forward to a productive time with this.
Hope you like my new template...
blogger.com
Newly acquired... test